Buying a boat.

(Previously the YotBlog forums, now archived and combined here)
Garry72
Midshipman
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:31 am

Buying a boat.

Postby Garry72 » Thu Oct 28, 2010 10:37 am

Hi to you all.
Having just joined this forum and spent the last half hour looking for the appropriate place to post my first question I thought 'well it's about a boat topic' so i'll post it here.

Basically I am new to all this sailing lark and enjoying every minute of it too.
Having just completed day skipper theory and a dinghy sailing course, which was fun although quite cold, I am now faced with that daunting thought of 'I should get my own boat'!

I would like to go for a sailing yacht perhaps something around 35-45' long but sundenly realised that I know nothing of what is needed after buying the boat!
Ok you have to insure it and pay to keep it somewhere but can anyone tell me or point me in the right direction/book/website, as to what other things I need to think about when owning a boat?
I guess I am looking for a check list type answer that says when you purchase a yacht you need to do this, this and this.

Any help and advice would be much appreciated.
Many thanks
Garry

User avatar
marisca
Yellow Admiral
Posts: 1275
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:55 am
Boat Type: Contessa 32
Location: Edinburgh

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby marisca » Thu Oct 28, 2010 11:35 am

Welcome Garry, and I'm sure there will be others along soon to do the same.

If your question is serious, I feel it is a bit like an "o"-grade physics student asking how to build a large hadron collider from scratch. My recommendation would be to get thee to your nearest sailing club and get involved while continuing your sailing education to include some practical courses. Sailing on other people's boats will give you a feel for what is involved and will lead you into the minutiae of boat ownership 'cos most boat owners love to moan about the cost of marinas, moorings, laying-up, antifouling, sails, maintenance, diesel, etc. ad infinitum. The most probable conclusion is that all boat owners are basically nuts - the inescapable economic logic is that for most people, the amount of sailing they do would be cheaper if they simply chartered a boat but the emotional attachment to a hole in the water into which they pour money somehow outweighs that.

The RYA do books with titles like "Buying Your First Sailing Cruiser" http://www.amazon.co.uk/Book-Buying-First-Sailing-Cruiser/dp/0713668725/ref=sr_1_34?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1288262334&sr=1-34and that may be a good way to start - just make sure you buy it via the Amazon link on this site.

Good luck

User avatar
sahona
Admiral of the White
Posts: 1967
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 8:17 pm
Boat Type: Marcon Claymore
Location: Clyde

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby sahona » Thu Oct 28, 2010 12:50 pm

You don't say where you're located, but the first thing to think about is where to park it after you've got it!
That probably means either a club/association or a marina - either of which will have people who can give guidance from their own experience.
A 45 footer takes a bit of looking after, or a fat wallet if you're buying help.
Oh, and welcome to the sometimes surreal world of boating by the way.
http://trooncruisingclub.org/ 20' - 30' Berths available, Clyde.
Cruising, racing, maintenance facilities. Go take a look, you know you want to.

User avatar
Orla
Master Mariner
Posts: 196
Joined: Sun Sep 24, 2006 5:08 pm
Boat Type: Lafitte 44
Location: West Coast Scotland
Contact:

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby Orla » Thu Oct 28, 2010 1:08 pm

Garry72 wrote:I would like to go for a sailing yacht perhaps something around 35-45' long but sundenly realised that I know nothing of what is needed after buying the boat!
Ok you have to insure it and pay to keep it somewhere but can anyone tell me or point me in the right direction/book/website, as to what other things I need to think about when owning a boat?
I guess I am looking for a check list type answer that says when you purchase a yacht you need to do this, this and this.


Hi Gary and welcome

I think you have a lot of work ahead of you, it took us five years of looking, poking, reading, asking & pestering to find out what kind of boat we wanted/needed (there is a difference), when we started looking we didn’t know enough about yachts and didn’t have the money required either.
If we did we would have bought the wrong boat and lost an awful lot of money.
You need to decide what kind of sailing you are going to do and where you are going to do it, e.g. racing, cruising, Solent, med, west coast Scotland, Shetland, Norway, weekend sailing, summer holiday sailing, living aboard heading for the warmer climes, living aboard heading for the colder climes.
All of the above require a lot of thought; I wouldn't want to buy a racing boat designed for thrashing about at the weekend and then try and liveaboard it and head for Canada and vice versa.

The best thing you can do is to get out and look at as many boats as you possibly can, tour the Marinas, the second hand boat sites (not hard to find) build up a picture of what different types of boats cost and what is involved in keeping one and sailing one, do you want a boat you can handle by yourself, if so start looking at a much smaller boat or spending lots of money on getting a bigger boat rigged for single handing.

You are asking for help on an enormous subject, so start reading everything from sail handling books to maintenance books, magazines. Yachting forums have a huge amount of information on everything from how to stop keels falling off Bavaria’s to solving a virus on your laptop.
Try YBW forum as well, I gained a huge amount of information over the years from it, use the search facility or try posting but you will find pretty much all your questions will already have been answered at some point.....you will find some very helpful people there and also some very unhelpful, you takes your chance... :)
I wish you all the best; you are where we were 10 years ago.....

Garry72
Midshipman
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:31 am

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby Garry72 » Thu Oct 28, 2010 1:44 pm

Thank you for the responses so far.
I guess I should have been a bit more specific with my question.

Would it be better if I just asked for now what makes you legal on the water?
If I was asking the question in relation to a car you would all answer, tax,insurance and MOT.
What is the boating equivilent?
I know it costs to park and maintain but not an issue as yet as that all depends on the boat and where it is etc...
I am in the London area so south coast possibly east coast is where it will be moored and sailed to start with.

User avatar
marisca
Yellow Admiral
Posts: 1275
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:55 am
Boat Type: Contessa 32
Location: Edinburgh

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby marisca » Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:01 pm

The answer is easy! Nothing!

There is no requirement for insurance, licence, no certificate of seaworthiness - nada. But a marina won't let you in without 3rd party insurance, neither will the canals. Even the Crown Estates want insurance for a mooring. So that means if you want to be anywhere but the open sea you need insurance and that means persuading the insurance companies you are an insurable risk which in turn means knowledge, demonstration of ability, etc.

But there is nothing to stop you buying a boat and setting off.

Garry72
Midshipman
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:31 am

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby Garry72 » Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:12 pm

Oh just a quick response for Marisca.
I often knock up a hadron collider at the weekends it's very theraputic.
If you are interested, here's what you need-

•9,300 magnets
•10,000 tons of liquid nitrogen (minimum)
•90 tons of liquid helium (minimum)
•17 miles of concrete-lined piping (approx)
•Main accelerator unit
•Subatomic particles
•Computer (Windows XP,Vista or 7 64bit)
•Shovel
•Work Gloves
•Protective Glasses
•Thermos flask for tea breaks

1 Dig a trench 160feet deep by 17miles in diameter and lay the concrete piping in it.
2 Attach the 9,300 magnets to the piping at regular intervals to force your protons, neutrons, quarks etc through the tunnel. Connect everything together (wires, switches, refrigeration piping, main accelerator unit) before burying the entire assembly. Make sure to run a cable to the surface in order to connect it to your desktop computer or laptop.
3 Plug it in to an electricity supply ( you may use an extension cable)
4 Your magnets must be kept at superconducting temperatures (-271.3°C). Cool your magnets by first mixing together with 10,000 tons of liquid nitrogen with 90 tons of liquid helium. Don' forget the googles and gloves for this.
5 You are now ready to accelerate the subatomic particles through the main tunnel.
6 Open the thermos flask of tea, sit back and admire you handy work.

User avatar
sahona
Admiral of the White
Posts: 1967
Joined: Thu Jan 03, 2008 8:17 pm
Boat Type: Marcon Claymore
Location: Clyde

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby sahona » Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:18 pm

Garry72 wrote:..... what makes you legal on the water?

Nationally, nothing. No tax disk, no insurance, no MOT, no licence.
However, 3rd party insurance of about £3million is required by a marina in case you run amok. Local requirements vary.
Everything is taxed anyway.
Seaworthyness is something applicable to the type of water you're in, so an MOT as such is difficult to quantify,but common sense should prevail.
Guidance is available by 'categories' A,B,C etc from offshore to canals, and safety equipment varies to suit.
Your ability to drive the thing will either gain you respect or derision.
You won't be arrested for having no paperwork, or an inappropriate vessel, but it makes sense to do it right, as the life in question is your own.
OH dear, I see I'm typing in full duplex with Marisca -sorry!
http://trooncruisingclub.org/ 20' - 30' Berths available, Clyde.
Cruising, racing, maintenance facilities. Go take a look, you know you want to.

User avatar
marisca
Yellow Admiral
Posts: 1275
Joined: Wed Sep 03, 2008 11:55 am
Boat Type: Contessa 32
Location: Edinburgh

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby marisca » Thu Oct 28, 2010 2:42 pm

Garry72 wrote:Oh just a quick response for Marisca.
I often knock up a hadron collider at the weekends it's very theraputic.
If you are interested, here's what you need-

•9,300 magnets
•10,000 tons of liquid nitrogen (minimum) ................... etc.


Aye, after that it looks like you should find buying, owning and sailing a boat no bother at all, just keep it to <25m long otherwise you do need qualifications.

User avatar
Arghiro
Old Salt
Posts: 918
Joined: Tue Jan 01, 2008 12:54 pm
Boat Type: Pentland Ketch
Location: Midlands

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby Arghiro » Thu Oct 28, 2010 11:42 pm

Have a look at the RNLI site, lots of examples of what can go wrong there. All you have to do is avoid those mistakes. Learning to read a chart & tide tables is a good start for the E Coast & Thames Estuary as the water is pretty thin there & disappears twice a day.

Garry72
Midshipman
Posts: 4
Joined: Thu Oct 28, 2010 9:31 am

Re: Buying a boat.

Postby Garry72 » Fri Oct 29, 2010 4:11 pm

Thank you again for all the responses.

Arghiro - I hope to be putting my tide and chart knowledge to the test on Sunday down near Bournemouth.
Many thanks


Return to “Basically Boaty”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests