The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

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Silkie
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The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Silkie » Sun Feb 20, 2011 11:18 pm

I see that Rocna have purchased the ex-Raya domain.

http://www.ancoralatina.com/

:lol:
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Arghiro
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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Arghiro » Mon Feb 21, 2011 9:36 pm

Who cares?

I am old generation & so is my boat, we are both perfectly content with our "old generation" CQR. :goatd

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Silkie
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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Silkie » Mon Feb 21, 2011 11:53 pm

Arghiro wrote:Who cares?

I am old generation & so is my boat, we are both perfectly content with our "old generation" CQR. :troll:

I'm pretty sure that's not going to work here Steve. :P

Anyway I was only commenting on the fact that Rocna (or someone associated with them :) ) has thought it worthwhile to purchase the domain name of a now defunct and never other than very small anchor manufacturer to install a redirect to Peter Smith's site.

As the proud possessor of what is probably the only Raya in the UK I am happy to admit that this observation may only be of interest to a minority.
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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Arghiro » Tue Feb 22, 2011 7:40 pm

So you suspect signs of desperation then?

As I have said elsewhere, I will replace my non-DSC radio & my CQR anchor when they are worn out. But I suspect that I may meet my maker sooner.

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Silkie » Wed Feb 23, 2011 12:46 am

Arghiro wrote:So you suspect signs of desperation then?

I suspect that it was probably personal :) although I have no idea whether Alain Poiraud was actually associated with the design of the Raya.

The mind boggles at the notion of a CQR wearing out - in a single lifetime anyway.
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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby stevepick » Wed Feb 23, 2011 2:27 pm

Silkie wrote:The mind boggles at the notion of a CQR wearing out - in a single lifetime anyway.


Oh no , hooked into an anchor thread!!

I have seen a few bust ones, including last year or the year before, a really big yacht in Dunst, blue hull 60 odd footer with CQR - shaft and flukes bent, there's also worn hinge/pivot syndrome. :)

Steve

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Arghiro » Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:08 pm

Silkie wrote: [(snip)
The mind boggles at the notion of a CQR wearing out - in a single lifetime anyway.


Quite, that was the "point" of the quip. Had you not cottoned on to my sardonic style yet?

I don't see much likelyhood of mine breaking either as I generally pull it up by hand. I am a tough old boot, but even at 13st, I am unlikely to exert enough force to break an anchor. It it ever gets even slightly close I will simply slip the chain with a marker bouy & either come back with professional lifting gear or buy a new anchor & chain, depending on which solution is the cheaper.

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Nick » Wed Feb 23, 2011 5:09 pm

stevepick wrote: there's also worn hinge/pivot syndrome.

I'm worried about Claymore.
- Nick 8)

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Silkie » Wed Feb 23, 2011 10:51 pm

Dog help me but I very nearly posted on an anchor thread elsewhere. A Youtube video was mentioned without a link so I had a look and found this, ostensibly a straight comparison of two beach pulls each on Rocna and Sarca anchors.

[youtube]http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=xM_i4w8eqTw[/youtube]

You can make up your own minds but it doesn't look like a very straight comparison to me.
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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby sam » Thu Feb 24, 2011 12:07 am

Wow, look at the different speed used in each test. Not really doing themselves any favours.

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Craig Smith » Thu Feb 24, 2011 9:57 am

The different speed is the result of constant force applied but different setting behaviors. The test is perfectly fair. If your boat wipes off quickly in strong winds and is rapidly doing 5 knots downwind, that's just tough for the anchor.

In any case, the video above was posted originally to serve as a counter to some really corrupt nonsense from an Australian manufacturer which Fortress was using to attack Rocna. It is out of context above. If you look at Rocna's marketing material they use only independent testing and third party feedback - it's much more credible and effective.

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Mark » Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:04 am

Craig Smith wrote:If your boat wipes off quickly in strong winds and is rapidly doing 5 knots downwind


...then you didn't have enough chain out! :-)

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Nick » Thu Feb 24, 2011 11:38 am

Mark wrote:
Craig Smith wrote:If your boat wipes off quickly in strong winds and is rapidly doing 5 knots downwind


...then you didn't have enough chain out! :-)

I think Craig means while you are setting the anchor. In strong winds the boat may blow off as fast as you can get the chain out, meaning that the anchor may need to set on a short scope with considerable force on it if it is to hold and allow you to deploy the correct amount of chain. Generally the Spade is very good at digging in in these conditions, and I imagine the Rocna is as well. The problem with all anchor tests that simulate a steady pull is that real life is rarely like that and very few anchors break out under a steady pull in normal conditions once properly set. The absolute holding power of a Spade or a Rocna over (say) a CQR assuming they are all properly set and buried is only (IMO) likely to become a factor in winds of F8 or more for most boats. That is when CQR owners are liable to mess around with asecond anchoror anchor watches, while NG owners can sleep as long as the howling allows.

(I have been on board a friends' Twister in Canna when his CQR appeared to drag after holding for a day and a half in a F7, but In suspect it was the kelp the anchor was hooked round finally giving way rather than the anchor pulling out of the sand)
- Nick 8)

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Arghiro » Thu Feb 24, 2011 12:17 pm

Trying to set an anchor when drifting at 5kts is plain daft - and really dangerous for anyone trying to handle the chain. Even with an electric windlass (who uses that sort of gismo on small sailly boats?) the risk to losing or breaking the gear is high.

If winds are that strong I would look to find a safe harbour. If none handy, then I would use the engine to manage the drift. I anchor in strong tide areas where drift & current together can create problems, but fast deployment of already flaked chain together with sensible use of engine to reduce drift means that I keep my fingers & my CQR sets nicely.

Maybe a Rocna or some other over priced, fancy gadget will be better than my CQR, but I still haven't had a situation that warrants the cost for me to find out for mayself. long may it be so.

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Re: The New Generation of Small Boat Anchors

Postby Mark » Thu Feb 24, 2011 12:38 pm

Nick wrote:Generally the Spade is very good at digging in in these conditions, and I imagine the Rocna is as well.


We're all adults. I suspect none of us have lost a boat due to a dragging anchor yet. Let's leave it at that. :)

Nick wrote:(I have been on board a friends' Twister in Canna when his CQR appeared to drag after holding for a day and a half in a F7, but In suspect it was the kelp the anchor was hooked round finally giving way rather than the anchor pulling out of the sand)


That's an excuse for my salty Canna story.

I've only been to Canna once and that was in a good F7. We found Martin Lawrence in there. We were rather chuffed because he'd decided it was too windy that day to do Canna->Kyle Loch Alsh, whereas we'd come close hauled all the way from Barra. (We were soaked and he was comfy but I bet both our grins had been bigger all day.)

Our fisherman got straight through the weed and held fine, or maybe it wasn't set and the chain held us. Or maybe it was held by a weed root or hooked on a rock - we'll never know. A magical day and night, though.


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