Hove to?

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Clyde_Wanderer
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Hove to?

Postby Clyde_Wanderer » Mon Jul 11, 2011 10:31 pm

Having been sailing since 2006 I probably should know this but here goes.
What does this manouvre entail and when should it be excercised?
Have any forumites here ever done it?
TIA, C_W

Gardenshed
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Re: Hove to?

Postby Gardenshed » Tue Jul 12, 2011 1:37 am

Clyde_Wanderer wrote:Having been sailing since 2006 I probably should know this but here goes.
What does this manouvre entail and when should it be excercised?
Have any forumites here ever done it?
TIA, C_W


It is a method of "stopping" so that you can get some rest (in lighter winds) or in heavy winds (and when you have sea room) setting up the boat to ride our a storm without you having to proactively sail the boat.
In essence, you tack the boat, but don't tack the jib, release the mainsheet and then once the jib is backed you turn the helm in the oposite direction. Then lock/lash the helm in that position. The backed jib is pushing you one way and he rudder the other. The result is that you don't go forward, but once the boat settles down, you finish up gently bobbing up and down and making a knot or so (depending on wind and waves) of leeway.
Older long keel boats will sit hove to more comfortably than modern lightweight boats with slender keels and rudders.
To get going again, release the tiller/wheel, straighten up the rudder and let the jib push the boat around to a reach/fetch, release the windward jib sheet and then sheet in normally and sail on.
Are you on port or starboard when doing this? depends on the position of the boom. Impact on Colregs etc.? ....post that question on ToP and sit back to watch the pedants.
If you have a big genoa, then depending on wind stregth and sea state, you may want to roll away some of the genoa before you back it.
Worth trying one afternoon when you have a bit of searoom just for practice. You'll be amazed at how comfortably the boat sits, ideal for boiling the kettle, making some food without the worry of checking what you're going to run into. Of course, someone is bound to call the coastguard or lifeboat as they will suspect that something dreadful has happened and that you are stuck.

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marisca
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Re: Hove to?

Postby marisca » Tue Jul 12, 2011 7:23 am

I did it for a couple of hours off Kintyre last Tuesday. The Coastguard's "occasionally 7", actually over 40kts, was making forward progress uncomfortable so I sat still until it was obvious I had missed the tide and then ran off to Port Ellen. Next day I motored round in a flat calm!
One of the benefits is the flattening of the water to windward by the turbulence coming from the keel moving sideways through the water, rather like the smooth tidal whirls of Luing.

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Clyde_Wanderer
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Re: Hove to?

Postby Clyde_Wanderer » Wed Jul 13, 2011 11:57 pm

Thanks for the advice.
I will try the manouvre when I am next out.
C_W

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Fingal
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Re: Hove to?

Postby Fingal » Sun Jul 17, 2011 5:16 pm

Heaving too can require slightly different tactics depending on the type of rig. My Folkboat needed to have the mainsheet eased quite a lot to succesfully heave to, the big main and small jib, and the weight of the boat carrying her way some distance, mean that if you just follow the standard instructions you are likely to find the boat just sailing along at a couple of knots with the jib aback. Easing the main until it's no longer driving will help stop the boat and then you can trim sheets to get the best balance. The opposite of course is true with a masthead rigged large genoa & small main where you may find your big genoa pushes the bow well downwind unless reduced as Gardenshed suggests.
Ken
Fulmar 32 Fingal

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Clyde_Wanderer
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Re: Hove to?

Postby Clyde_Wanderer » Thu Jul 21, 2011 11:23 pm

Gardenshed, Thanks for your explanation, just to recap, do I put the helm to windward or leaward?
Thanks C_W
PS thanks Uphill too.

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Re: Hove to?

Postby Gardenshed » Fri Jul 22, 2011 2:41 am

Clyde_Wanderer wrote:Gardenshed, Thanks for your explanation, just to recap, do I put the helm to windward or leaward?
Thanks C_W
PS thanks Uphill too.


Is you start by sailing on port tack, the helm if pushed to starboard, the boat turns through the wind, and the genoa backs (which you don't release). If you keep the helm in that position, the boat will keep on turning, so you then pull the helm over the other way (to port)i i.e. after the "tack", it goes to leeward. The mainsheet should be released. The boat is then balanced by the rudder trying to turn the boat to starboard and the genoa tring to turn the boat to port and it will find a balanced state where it just settles down going nowhere.
Go try it and all will become clear:

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Re: Hove to?

Postby ubergeekian » Sat Jul 23, 2011 10:34 pm

I did some experiments in heaving-to while watching the tall ships. 26' long keeler. The helm down, let her come round, helm across routine worked fine and saw her heave to at about 45 degree to the wind, but it was unstable. After a few minutes a slight gust or a larger wave would speed her up and she'd then swing round, fast, and settle again at 90 degree to the wind. That appeared to be quite stable, but as we were then broadside on to the waves it was potentially a bit uncomfortable. More experiments will follow.
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