Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

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marisca
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby marisca » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:21 am

I've got a boat, only 27 years old with mast, engine and Autohelm ST50 instruments of the same age, Dacron sails that could be newer (or even Kevlar/carbon fibre), a 27 year old spinnaker with about 50m of sticky tape holding it together, a GPS 128 (anchor alarm does work on mine) .... I could go on .... and a CQR copy with 50m of chain (regalvanised 2 years ago) + 30m of anchorplait as a bower and a Bruce on 5m of chain + dodgy looking nylon rope as kedge. My rapidly diminishing pile of pennies has bought over the last couple of years new standing rigging, a liferaft, an ocean set of flares and a variety of other goodies deemed essential for my and the boat's wellbeing + all the unavoidable costs of ownership.

So where do I spend my next £500+? The 4 year old genoa split last week, I'm using Imray charts for bits I would really like Admiralty ones for, a DSC radio would be nice, the spinnaker is really on its last legs, a donk with a bit more oomph and a Darglow prop would be luxury, a chartplotter (and maps) might give me the courage to go singlehanded into those places that feel like they need one eye on the chart, one eye on the depth gauge and one eye at the bow looking for rocks, the EPIRB battery went out of date in August, the 27 year old tufnol blocks are really passed their best etc. etc.

And Nick wants me to buy a new anchor! Admittedly this year I've had to reanchor in Bunessan, Canna, Craighouse, Salen, Tobermory, and I'm sure there must be more, 'cos of weed or just not setting so there is evidence of need but most nights a brick on a piece of string would have held the boat (but not promoted sleep). It's just a matter of balancing priority against money supply with the sad reality that I cannot really afford to own a boat. The cost of a new anchor isn't really the problem, it's the cost of all the other things that are above it in the want/need list.

Contributions to the Marisca boat fund can be made to A/c 00433331 80-15-86 and will be gratefully acknowledged.

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Nick
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby Nick » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:43 am

.
I sympathise, but I think you should reprioritise your wants/needs list, particularly in light of your longish list of dragging incidents. IMO the only purchases ahead of a good anchor would be other purchases that would otherwise directly compromise the safety of the boat, such as through-hull fittings, rudder etc. As I said, we bought the anchor before we even knew which Vega we were buying.

Everything else is a luxury compared to a good anchor, which will save you when your elderly engine fails or sails split asunder. What I would most like is to redesign the foredeck so the Spade sits on a bow roller ready for instant action; as it is there is a bit if a carry-on when I have to untie it from the pulpit and lift it over before deploying it, but at least I know it will hold pretty much as soon as it hits the bottom.

So - sew up that genoa, service that engine, and you don't need an EPIRB if you are sailing within VHF range (and it will probably work anyway). Order a new Spade and then start saving for a chartplotter - they are the DsBs for happy inshore exploration, and will get you into lots of interesting places to use your new anchor.
- Nick 8)

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marisca
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby marisca » Fri Sep 04, 2009 11:59 am

Nick wrote:.
I sympathise, but I think you should reprioritise your wants/needs list, particularly in light of your longish list of dragging incidents.


I'm glad to say there is an even longer list of no problem anchoring and I don't count taking another go at setting as dragging. I eventually get the thing well dug in and holding (or think I do) though the tales of dragging after a couple of days are worrying.

Maybe I should get a job!

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Nick
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby Nick » Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:15 pm

Maybe I should get a job!

Steady on, no need for desperate measures surely! :lol:
- Nick 8)

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claymore
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby claymore » Fri Sep 04, 2009 12:34 pm

We use a fine Scottish Anchor wi a fine Scottish name.
Bruce
Never drags anywhere - no matter what.
Plenty of 10mm chain and an oversized anchor - the only ones who come unstuck are the silly beggars using coathooks and lavvie chain.

Go on then - pick the bones out of that.
Regards
Claymore
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Nick
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby Nick » Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:25 pm

.
Horses for courses Claysie.

Genuine Bruce anchors or Claw type anchors have difficulty penetrating weedy bottoms and grass. They offer a fairly low holding power to weight ratio and generally have to be over-sized to compete with other types. On the other hand they perform relatively well with low rode scopes and set fairly reliably. You have I note felt it necesary to install an electric windlass. We use musclepower, with a 10Kg anchor and 8mm chain. However, I would choose a 15Kg Spade and a windlass for Claymore was I her skeely skipper.

It is unlikely you will drag far on the hard in Fleetwood :)
- Nick 8)

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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby aquaplane » Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:35 pm

Nick wrote:As this is an anchoring thread I fully expect loads of personal abuse, so don't hold back :)

Who said we need an anchoring thread to generate personal abuse?

I have a job, I wouldn't recommend it.
Seminole.
Cheers Bob.

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Rowana
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby Rowana » Fri Sep 04, 2009 5:52 pm

I've not a lot to add to Ron's excellent description of our "Wee problem", only to say that it took a herculean effort by Ron to recover the bower.

Needless to say that once we had picked up the mooring and had a cuppa to calm ourselves, the wind completely died away. Sod's law, I suppose.

Here's a photo taken in the morning before we slipped the mooring -

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BLESSED ARE THOSE WHO ARE CRACKED,
FOR THEY ARE THE ONES WHO LET IN THE LIGHT

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Silkie
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby Silkie » Sat Sep 05, 2009 8:30 pm

I must say that I'm disappointed in you Jim. I was relying on you to look after him.

Jist kiddin' Ron.

:hardhat:
different colours made of tears

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puddock
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby puddock » Sun Sep 06, 2009 5:52 pm

Traumatic Stress ???
Just spent 2 nights at Dunstaffnage (in p&ssing rain). I woke at 3 in the morning to "check the anchor" and couldn't figure out where all the lights had come from? It took a second to realise I was still firmly tied to the side of the marina.
Is this a sign of Traumatic Stress Disorder or is it a side effect of copious quantities of Highlander Ale and Port?

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Silkie
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby Silkie » Sun Sep 06, 2009 6:17 pm

Bit of both probably. :)
different colours made of tears

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Rowana
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby Rowana » Mon Sep 07, 2009 12:50 pm

We should have gone round the corner a wee bit - -

Just found this on t'internet -

http://www.hollytreehotel.co.uk/index.html

Here's the map -
http://www.streetmap.co.uk/map.srf?x=20 ... hp=ids.srf

(Zoom out one click)

To quote from the hotel site -

"Sailing
The area is extremely popular for sailing and we often have cruising yachts stop off at the Hotel, for dinner or just "refreshments". We have visitors moorings which are free for diners in the bar or restaurant."
BLESSED ARE THOSE WHO ARE CRACKED,
FOR THEY ARE THE ONES WHO LET IN THE LIGHT

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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby Aja » Mon Sep 07, 2009 1:26 pm

Really a reply to Nick re upgrading technology from t'old stuff which is CQR/Bruce based to modern designs. I have to admit I was brought up on the CQR and use a 35lb CQR on my current boat. I have never dragged in the last 10 years anchoring other than failing to bite and subsequently re-laying. In my cockpit locker I also have a bl00dy heavy Bruce anchor. Don't know what it does, but it sits there quietly waiting to be used. One day.

Now for the nub of it. As I havn't dragged in such a long time - maybe about (say) thirty opportunities to anchor per season, I'm reluctant to leave 35lbs of galvanised metal and invest in another 15kg of galvanised metal. The reason I use a CQR? It came with the boat. I'm used to it and aware of its foibles. Maybe I've been lucky, but I've also been able to sit snugly at anchor and watch more modern boats skite past me. There is more to it than design IMO - technique (dumping the lot in one go and motoring backwards should win a Darwin Award :) ). It is less easy to buy this across the counter these days. This isn't smugness, but an interested take on the subject.

Donald

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claymore
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby claymore » Mon Sep 07, 2009 2:59 pm

Absolutely Donald - couldn't agree more, although we did upgrade our Wee Bruce to Big Bruce based on the advice of the yard foreman at Kilmelford who thought it was a bit light for the boat and as we were fitting the windlass then it made sense to upgrade to 10mm chain at the same time. His name was is also Bruce. As you say - we have sat still when others about us have not.

If anyone mentions Puilldobhran, the Gents cruise and our anchoring technique they are
most probably going to get dobbed, so shut it Shard. We were being careful and considerate.
Regards
Claymore
:goatd

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ash
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Re: Kentallen Bay - Drama on the High Seas

Postby ash » Mon Sep 07, 2009 3:11 pm



Hey - I like Streetmap - hadn't found it before - especially it's use of OS maps - seems to load / refresh much more quickly than other map sites.

Cheers

Ash
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Albin Vega "Mistral" is now sold


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