Powder Coating

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Orla
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Powder Coating

Postby Orla » Tue May 24, 2016 7:30 pm

Hi
Does anybody know where I could get some powder coating done in the Clyde area.
Want to tidy up my windlass and a few port light frames..

Dougie

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BlowingOldBoots
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Re: Powder Coating

Postby BlowingOldBoots » Thu May 26, 2016 9:01 am

Geoff who galvanised our chains and anchors also does colour coating: -

http://www.higalv.co.uk

They have a special process for aluminium described on the link above.

You asked about the fuel tank cleaning service I was using. The bloke should have been down yesterday to clean the tanks so I'll get some pictures and post them here.
BlowingOldBoots

What time does the 24hour garage close?
http://www.rivalowners.org.uk

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Gordonmc
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Re: Powder Coating

Postby Gordonmc » Thu May 26, 2016 11:30 am

I have used Carrick Engineering, just off Prestwick Airport. Shaw Farm industrial estate.
They powder-coated a windlass for me, although their main work seems to be refurbishing car wheels.
01292 67889

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Orla
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Re: Powder Coating

Postby Orla » Fri May 27, 2016 10:33 am

I did wonder if Geoff's company could do it. Just been called away to work so its on hold now till I get back.
Will be interesting to see how the fuel tank cleaning went.

Thanks Gordonmac

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mm5aho
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Re: Powder Coating

Postby mm5aho » Mon May 30, 2016 1:34 pm

There are many places that do powdercoating, but like all coating systems, its the preparation that counts not the application (though that must be competent too)

But don't let this technology faze anyone. Its only paint applied differently.

the term "Powder coating" doesn't define the coating material, rather the method of application.
The coating can be replicated by "wet" paints, and vice versa.
Coating chemistries such as polyester, polyurethane, epoxy, PVC, Nylon etc can all be delivered (applied) by wet systems or powder applied.

The performance isn't any better provide the application was competent, and the pretreatment suitable.

The industry has a relatively low cost of entry (doesn't cost a lot to set up), and so attracts operators at every level from "cowboy" to high spec industrial scale.

You should not have to travel far to find a powder coater. I did a survey in 2001, and there were 22 operations in Scotland. There are likely to be more than that now.

What to ask for:
1. Given my described application, base metal and environment the item will experience, what coating type do you recommend?
If you get an answer that doesn't include names like those mentioned above, then this outfit might not know very much about it.

2. What pretreatment do you do before applying powder?
If you get mentions of "wipe down with a solvent rag", or "thoroughly clean it first", then dig a bit deeper.
There are two main pre-treatment technologies. Blasting clean and chemical.
Blasting is pretty obvious, a high velocity impact by a stream of blast media, usually propelled by compressed air, and often chilled iron, garnet grit, copper slag, stainless grit, or similar (It's never sand, that breeds silicosis in the operator). This blasting cleans and "re-profiles" the surface. ie makes it rough to "key" the coating. Something for the coating to anchor to.
Chemical does much the same, cleaning and ensuring adhesion, but usually by growing a crystal on the surface for the coating to bind to.
Cleaning on its own is rarely enough, so "solvent wash" etc is not enough.

3. What temperature do you cure at?
You don't need to know the answer, its just another question to ask to see if they know what they're talking about.



For a windlass, a single coat system is probably not enough, and a reasonable system would be an epoxy primer followed by a polyester top coat. Epoxy for good saltwater resistance, and polyester for the UV resistance that epoxy lacks.
Geoff.
"Contender" Rival 32: Roseneath this winter, Gourock in summer.


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