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Engine man?

Posted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 8:22 pm
by aquaplane
I had a call from Dumbarton this afternoon.

When the engine on Seminole was run to test it before it went in the water, (don't ask, it sounded a bit arse about face to me) there was oil and water in the exhaust. Further investigation confirmed that something is seriously wrong. The marine engineer is busy and it may be a couple of months before anything can be done :(
I don't know which engineer they have talked to but I assume there aren't thousands of them waiting to pounce on any problem and cure it as if by magic, but there must be more than one.

Who would you call, in what order?

It was busy in the memorial park but very nice sat on the grass in the sun. :D

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:30 pm
by ash
That doesn't sound very good.

Some random thoughts

A monopoly situation might prevail in the yard, so they may not allow 'outside' engineers to work.

The young engineer, Nick, who covers Ardlui is mobile, ie works from a van – I'll see if I can find a link. I suspect that his main line of work is electronically controlled mobo engines, and he might not be cheap. He seems a pleasant chap though.

My first suspicion would be frost damage – oil cooler? , water cooled gearbox? What engine is it?

Could be head gasket.

I hope that it gets sorted.

Are your Mum and Dad at the boat?

Ash

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 10:27 pm
by ash
I'm struggling on a wifi dongle at the moment.

Try googling Nick O'Donnell and marine engineer
and Colin Camburn and marine engineer

Ash
http://www.wdcweb.info/businessdirectory/?entryid5=42393&char=O

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 10:39 pm
by Arghiro
It is common to set up a water supply to the engine & start & run it briefly before she goes in. The idea is that you know it will start & that you have control when the slings are released. When a lot of boats are going in this prevents congestion at the craning in point with boats drifting around failing to start, being held by odd ropes to the quay etc.

There should be water in the exhaust, not sure where the oil has come from tho.

I don't like the phrase that they "confirmed something was seriously wrong" - I would expect some clues or ideas from any person competent enough to say "something was seriously wrong". So, who said it & what evidence did they base the comment on?

The first question any engineer will ask is "what are the symptoms," yet the yard doesn't seem to have offered you much to support their statement. Best wishes & I hope it is sortable without a mortgage.

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 10:45 pm
by aquaplane
ash wrote:Are your Mum and Dad at the boat?

Ash

Yep, it was mum who called.

The engine is a 3 cylinder 50Hp BMW, raw water cooled, no turbo, no oil coller that I know of. AFAIK all the water is drained form the engine and it's left dry as opposed to flooding it with antifreeze for the winter. It's worked for 30 yrs up to now.

Sandpoint is a storage yard as opposed to a marina, I don't think they are too particular about who works there, but I could be wrong.

I only talked to mum, dad was coughing if he talked too much. From what she said there is water in the oil too, but I didn't ask too many questions as they seemd to be a bit down and talking to marine engineers isn't the sort of thing my dad does unless he has decided he can't sort it himself.

I'll pass on the contact details if they ring back before turning up fed up.

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:13 am
by Nick
.
If there is water in the oil as well then it may be the head gasket. Not necessarily disastrously expensive if you do it yourself, but an arm and a leg job in most yards.

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Sun Apr 10, 2011 12:12 pm
by aquaplane
Nick wrote:.
If there is water in the oil as well then it may be the head gasket. Not necessarily disastrously expensive if you do it yourself, but an arm and a leg job in most yards.

He doesn't count in arms and legs, it's usually "£1000, that's only 2 weeks in the nursing home", the new head sail furling was 3 weeks in a nursing home. He may as well spend it, you can't take it with you, the kids and grandkids would only waste it on boats and beer. :D

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Sun Apr 10, 2011 9:07 pm
by Aja
For an honest appraisal of your engine I would contact http://www.yell.com/b/West+Coast+Marine+Services+(Workboats)-Marine+Engines-Troon-KA106DJ-566313/index.html their website is down for maintenance at the moment - but get your parents to call Troon.

Hope all is well.

Regards
Donald

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Mon Apr 11, 2011 8:54 pm
by aquaplane
Things are progressing. The possible head gasket failure from last night has been confirmed as the most probable cause of whatever symptoms there are.

Someone has suggested they sail down to Troon for someone to look at it. I don't think they are keen to set off without engine.

I have been tasked with finding out what other folk have re-engined 30 yr old Jeanneau Espace 1000's with, but after an hour Googling I have found nothing.

Any ideas about new engines?
Who may supply and fit one?
Will they do it any quicker than mending the BMW?

I'm expecting a call back tomorow night.
Thanks in advance.

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Mon Apr 11, 2011 10:09 pm
by Arghiro
Head gasket, even if the head needs a skim, would be cheaper than a replacement engine. And a lot less work & time. It isn't that hard a job & doesn't even need the engine to come out. Check out the waterways for corrosion/ scaling.

New engine will probably need new bearers, shaft & possibly a prop. You would be looking at over 10k for that.

I can understand them not wanting to sail out of Dumbarton without an engine, but an outboard on the dinghy, tied alongside, would give you steerage to carry the ebb down to Troon, maybe anchoring off untill you can get into Troon if it is tide affected (don't know, never been in).

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 1:38 am
by Gardenshed
Arghiro:

An Espace being powered by a dinghy and outboard alongside from Dumbarton to Troon? I wouldn't recommend it. Its a long long day's sail and from Dumbatron to Greenock, a narrow shipping channel with little room for messing around.

Aquaplane:
Far better to have a chat to George Hulley and see who he might recommend or one of the surveyors in the area (Jim McIlraith at survey one, Ian Nicholson or others) or Euroyachts (Jeanneau Espace: Euoyachts being the local Jeanneau Dealer) and get a mechanic on board to replace the gasket. That part of Arghiro's post, I agree with.

The season will get better and better from now on....

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 11:34 am
by Arghiro
Gardenshed;

Noo, not all the way!!! Unless it was a 5hp motor with seperate 5G tank. And even then you'd still need a refuel, I guess.

But it would give me confidence to leave Dumbarton & head down towards Greenock on the ebb in light winds. There is room & safety just outside the channel, I have sailed down the wrong side of the markers many times. If the wind is favourable, then the Genny would be more efffective. The dink just gives you an extra option & steerage way in light winds.

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 1:02 pm
by Gardenshed
didn't for a second mean that you would do this all the way & stand by my comment. It would be an unnecessary risk to mess about coming out from the Leven to the main shipping channel not to mention entering Kip or Largs en route if necessary or when you finally get down to Troon. Just an unnecessary risk.

A man in a van can get to Sandpoint more easily and safely and between Rhu, Helensburgh, Dumbarton not to mention heading in towards Glasgow, there must be a decent diesel mechanic who can fix the engine.

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 1:38 pm
by Arghiro
Gardenshed wrote:(snip)
A man in a van can get to Sandpoint more easily and safely and between Rhu, Helensburgh, Dumbarton not to mention heading in towards Glasgow, there must be a decent diesel mechanic who can fix the engine.


Absolutely agree with that, especially for a relatively simple gasket replacement/ top end service (you might as well while the lid is off!)

Only downside of Sandpoint today is the loss of Ballantyne's :( & the glorious smell of the maltings wafting over the trots (where I kept Arghiro for a year or so).

Re: Engine man?

Posted: Tue Apr 12, 2011 2:34 pm
by So_Sage_of_Lorne
Gardenshed wrote:A man in a van can get to Sandpoint more easily and safely and between Rhu, Helensburgh, Dumbarton not to mention heading in towards Glasgow, there must be a decent diesel mechanic who can fix the engine.


I recommend Niall Falconer of Quay Marine Fairlie, 07787 803409 or 01475 568624.