Trustee from the Toolroom

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Silkie
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Trustee from the Toolroom

Postby Silkie » Tue Nov 25, 2008 1:30 am

What a lovely book! I was a great fan of the writings of Nevil Shute for a short while in my yoof and probably read this when I was 13 or 14. It recently surfaced in my consciousness and I remembered that there was a sailing angle in the story (three in fact) so it's been on my little list for a while.

I've just finished re-reading it for the first time in mumble years and thoroughly enjoyed it again. It's nicely observed and beautifully crafted as a story if a little Boys' Own perhaps. There's not a loose end left untied and everyone who doesn't die lives happily ever after. Indeed the last sentence is "He is perfectly, supremely happy."

On the Beach next, I think.
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Postby aquaplane » Tue Nov 25, 2008 8:50 am

Funny that, I'm just re-reading "So Disdained" and got "Requiem for a Wren" from the Library at the same time. I know aeroplanes feature strongly in his books, I'll look out for that one with boats in.
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Postby oldgaffer1 » Tue Nov 25, 2008 1:39 pm

A bit of a coincidence in that I've just finished reading 'Most Secret' where the action is set down here on the Dart and over in Brittany. It is the first time I've read Shute since school and I must say that, whilst probably not his best work, it made me yearn for the well crafted rattlin' good yarn.
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Postby Telo » Tue Nov 25, 2008 8:58 pm

Funnily enough just thinking about Shute the other day, which I haven't read since leaving school in the 60s. Didn't he "predict" airframe metal fatigue in one of this books?

I used the marks on "predicted" as I can't remember if he anticipated the engineering conclusions, or popularised them.

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Metal Fatigue

Postby Pete Cooper » Tue Nov 25, 2008 9:11 pm

Wasn't that 'No Highway'? Was it not seen as a prelude to the real life issues of metal fatigue in a plane called Comet? I believe that another one of his 'On The Beach' was considered a premonition of global nuclear war.

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Silkie
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Postby Silkie » Tue Nov 25, 2008 9:40 pm

I am finding it increasingly difficult to believe that everyone who uses this forum is a closet Shute fan and has either just read, is currently reading, or is just about to read one of his novels.

Come on Nick - tell us what childish drivel it all is!
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Postby Windfinder » Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:04 pm

Mr Onslow, my old English teacher, used to insist we read Shute and IMHO it was very good. Haven't read anything by him since I was about 14. Never will 'cos I've given up on fiction.

Happy memories though.

Mr O also encouraged us to read Hornblower & Flambards.

Funny how he knew what to recommend. In contrast a later Girlie teacher tried to make us like Jane Eire. FFS, what hetero lad would read that ***t.

For years I thought I just lacked the maturity to appreciate in but reading a chapter of Windfinderellas copy indicates that it is indeed unmitigated crap.

Thanks for the trip down memory lane, Silkie.

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Postby spuddy » Wed Nov 26, 2008 6:33 pm

I've got Trustee and his autobiography on the shelf which has some insights into R100 and R101 airships. He appeals because he wrote about what he knew about IN PRACTICE - so much nowadays is well done but is journalists swotting up on a subject [/b]

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Postby Rowana » Thu Nov 27, 2008 9:59 pm

I was a great Nevil Shute fan when I went to sea first, and read a lot of his books from the seafarers library.

Beyond the black stump, & Requiem for a Wren were a couple of my favourites.

You've rekindled my interest. Must see if I can get any from the library here.
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Postby Olivepage » Sat Nov 29, 2008 1:26 pm

"Funny how he knew what to recommend. In contrast a later Girlie teacher tried to make us like Jane Eire. FFS, what hetero lad would read that ***t. "

Pity you didn't read the title

Its Jane Eyre

Poor dear Charlotte will be revolving in her grave.

You should have tried Wuthering Heights.
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lady_stormrider
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Postby lady_stormrider » Sat Nov 29, 2008 10:14 pm

Having gone to a Gel's only educational establishment we got lots of lovely Austen, Bronte and Thomas Hardy. This is one of the reasons I chose NOT to study Eng Lit. and took the easier options of Biology, Maths and Chemistry.

I have, however, recently finished 'Round the Bend' - an excellent read and thoroughly enjoyed the recent Radio 4 adaptation of 'On the Beach' I still found the subjects in both books very relevant - even today.
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Olivepage
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Postby Olivepage » Sun Nov 30, 2008 1:40 am

Hmmm

Must admit I did a similar thing, preferring the the certainties of science to the vagaries of literature, particularly as Dickens & Mrs Gaskell were major features and I did not like either.

Austen is probably the most beautifully written of any novelist, sadly for me the style outweighs and overpowers the substance and eventually becomes irritating.

Hardy is a bit heavy - to the point were slashing ones wrists becomes an attractive option if one reads too much. But the Brontes, particularly Emily, are wonderful. I wonder what she could have produced to follow Wuthering Heights - given the time.

Tragic really that they all died so young. Ann particulary so. There is even a (slight) boaty link in that Ann died at Scarborough.
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Postby Windfinder » Mon Dec 01, 2008 10:20 pm

Olivepage wrote:"Funny how he knew what to recommend. In contrast a later Girlie teacher tried to make us like Jane Eire. FFS, what hetero lad would read that ***t. "

Pity you didn't read the title


No it isn't. Even reading two words of that tripe would be a waste of time.


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