What charts north of Ardnamurchan?

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Allegro
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What charts north of Ardnamurchan?

Postby Allegro » Tue Jun 24, 2008 1:28 pm

Hi

If the weather's kind we may head up beyond Ardnamurchan this summer, provided, that is, the trip doesn't promise to be too expensive in new charts! We'd hope to visit the Small Isles along with the mainland and Skye coast facing them. Its possible but less likely that we'd go beyond Kyle up into the Inner Sound.

At the moment all we've got of that area is Imray C66, along with the previous edition of Martin Lawrence. Looking at the Admiralty chart list I'm beginning to feel we've been a bit pampered with the detail available south of Ardnamurchan, especially since the leisure portfolio came out a couple of years ago (though why is it not possible to find an index chart online, rather than having to wade through a long list of chart titles?).

What would other people recommend as essential / useful by way of charts for this area? And did Martin Lawrence's pilot book change much between the 1st and 2nd editions?!

Cheers
Patrick
Sailing a Victoire 25 on the west coast of Scotland

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Telo
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Postby Telo » Wed Jun 25, 2008 1:07 am

We've only ventured to the Small Isles, Moidart, Knoydart, Barra, Skye and the coastline up to Plockton, so not experts on the the area, but....

Imray gives a good overall coverage, and some nice detail on the harbours. Depends what you want to do; we tend to use Imray for passage planning and UKHO charts for spotting the the smaller anchorages and shallow sounds. Doesn't need to cost a bomb; we use second hand charts (usually corrected to the date of purchase, but not always) from Marine Chart Services. Their uncorrected charts are really cheap, and, for the occasional visitor who has an up-to-date almanac with current buoy positions, why spend the extra? (I can feel Superstrath start to take deep breaths....).

We carry the CCC Sailing Directions, probably an old edition, but don't really care. We also carry old Martin Lawrence books from the old series; the books' area boundaries have changed, and, yes, there are some new causeways, but not a prob as long as you're alert. The new causeways are always in shallow water, and referred to in the current Almanacs, of which Reeds, and the Cruising Association, are both as tickety-boo as one might expect.

Personally, I wouldn't get too hung up about the latest charts or pilot books. It's just a fantastic area, so as long as we all keep wir collective wits aboot us, it's an amazing area to visit and explore. I'm sure you'll love it.

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Postby Daveanmucker » Wed Jun 25, 2008 7:58 am

I can confirm what Chard sez in his reply, I have found that the Martin Lawrence books are mostly what I use for sailing directions even though I carry the CCC directions I only use them rarely.

This year I invested in new Martin Lawrence's but apart from my old ones falling apart it was a waste of money, the main changes are the photographs, nothing that will cause problems.

I like Chard use Imray I have Admiralty charts for Kyle Rhea, inner sound etc. however hardly ever use them.

You will enjoy the trip and don't be intimidated by what the sailing directions say about spots like Arisaig, it is a lot easier than it seems spot the perches and don't cut corners and you will be ok.
We can't change the direction of the wind, but we can adjust our sails.

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Postby Ocklepoint » Wed Jun 25, 2008 10:56 am

Hi

I sailed round Skye a couple of years ago using the Imray charts. It was not very satisfactory. Scale not good for aging eyes.

Martin Lawrence good but a bit doom laden

This year I'm going back up that way again and then round to the Forth via Orkney.

I have managed to buy all the charts I need on ebay. There is a guy based in Plymouth who every week sells almost new, 2003-2006 charts.

The ones I have purchased have been in excellent condition. I think the average I have paid has been about £8.00 a chart including P&P.

Some of the popular ones will go or up to £15.00, the less popular for 99p.

Good luck.

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Postby Windfinder » Wed Jun 25, 2008 8:17 pm

Shard wrote:Personally, I wouldn't get too hung up about the latest charts or pilot books.



Wise words.

I charter so tend to have up to date charts and new CCC & Martin Lawrence guides provided.

However I always take my 1974 CCC Sailing Directions Blue Book and find it totally relevant. Frequently it contains detail missing from the latest tomes.

The west Coast isn't erroding that quickly!

(Mind you I'm not suggesting a 35 year old pilot guide alone is suitable for navigation - merely that you can get too hung up about it.)

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Postby Allegro » Thu Jun 26, 2008 10:43 am

Thanks very much for all the comments, particularly the sources of cheap charts. I'm reassured that we'll manage with not much more than we've already got, so hopefully I'll be able to report back a little later in the summer. That is, unless the weather's as foul as last summer when our two week summer cruise from Ardfern ended up pretty much as a two week tour of Loch Melfort (not that Loch Melfort isn't very nice, but it wasn't quite what we had planned!)

Cheers
Patrick
Sailing a Victoire 25 on the west coast of Scotland

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1974 CCC blue book

Postby tom26 » Thu Jun 26, 2008 10:43 am

in our fantastic local charity book shop last weekend I found that very book - I did not even know it existed (shows what I know)

have really enjoyed my reading so far of this book, really well written and like you say a lot has not changed - a whole load of new marinas though where there used to be pleasant bays such as Craobh. I do not know why they used to use Gaelic spellings but moved to English but again part of the interest

definitely worth having, particularly for £6 going to Oxfam!

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Re: 1974 CCC blue book

Postby Windfinder » Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:34 am

tom26 wrote:in our fantastic local charity book shop last weekend I found that very book - I did not even know it existed (shows what I know)

have really enjoyed my reading so far of this book, really well written and like you say a lot has not changed - a whole load of new marinas though where there used to be pleasant bays such as Craobh. I do not know why they used to use Gaelic spellings but moved to English but again part of the interest

definitely worth having, particularly for £6 going to Oxfam!


It's a corker isn' it. Packed full of detail that simply isn't available in modern guides. Winter evengings are brightened a lot by Hamish HS and the Blue Book.

I have mixed feelings about Croabh marina. Undoubtably it's a fine place ruined, and it attracts smeggy yotties from the South to overcrowd the area. On the other had as Marinas go it's the best and since I am a SYFTS I'm glad it's there!

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SYFTS

Postby DaveS » Mon Jun 30, 2008 3:36 pm

? :?

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Re: SYFTS

Postby Windfinder » Mon Jun 30, 2008 6:19 pm

DaveS wrote:? :?


"smeggy yotties from the South" it was there if you looked!

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DaveS
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SYFTS

Postby DaveS » Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:02 pm

Ah yes, I see it now. I'm not too good with FLAs. :)

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Re: SYFTS

Postby Windfinder » Mon Jun 30, 2008 7:45 pm

DaveS wrote:Ah yes, I see it now. I'm not too good with FLAs. :)


;-)

You're from Croabh? We sailed out of Croabh a few years back.

We asked the waitress in the Lord of The Isles how old the place was and she told us all the buildings in the village were recent. (1980s)

The war memorial suggests there was a settlement there some time before, so what the truth. Is it all new or are there some old buildings?

I'd have to say the Scots Brekkie in the Porta-cabin was something a bit special.

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DaveS
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Craobh

Postby DaveS » Tue Jul 01, 2008 8:31 am

Yes, I've kept the boat at Craobh for a number of years, as you can see from my profile. (That's one of the uses of completed profiles... :) )

The pub seems to change hands every 2 or 3 years, most recently a few weeks ago. The whole village is indeed purpose built, IIRC in the late 70s rather than the 80s, and is based vaguely on a fishing village in the East Neuk of Fife - which does make it a bit incongruous on the West Coast. There are a few older properties in the area, e.g. Lunga House.

The portacabin catering business was originally integrated with the marina office, but has been seperately run for some time. Various people have taken it up, run it for a year or two, then gone. I don't think there currently is a tenant, but then again I don't normally do breakfast... I think the main problem is that there's not enough traditional catering business on offer to support both the pub and a restaurant other than in the summer peak. The last tenant (or maybe the one before that) did start to do offer burgers, baked tatties, etc. in the evening, which was aiming at a market the pub does not really cater for, but then at the weekends they switched to much more upmarket dinners, i.e. back into direct competition with the pub and ignoring the potentially sizable lower priced market that currently eats on board or drives into Oban.


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